What do you want to know about managing stress?

People do one of two things when I tell them I'm a psychologist: get really uncomfortable and say "oh no, you're analyzing me!" OR ask a question.

The questions cover everything from "Is it normal for me to ..." to "how do I cope with ..." to "what should I do about ...?"

For months I've been filing those questions away in my head so I can create the best course possible to help you manage stress, thrive at work and at home, and be as resilient as possible.

And that's where you come in.

As I'm finishing up the content for the my stress management course, I need to know what you need to know.

Please use the form below to tell me what you want to know about stress, resilience, and thriving in humanitarian work. What are the big (and not so big) concerns you have about stress? What do you want to learn? What are the hardest parts of your work and your life? How does stress impact you now? And for bonus points, tell me how you want to feel instead. I promise I won't analyze you!

For bonus bonus points, please share this post with other humanitarians.

Photo Credit: Amy McTigue via Compfight cc



What Climbing Kilimanjaro Taught Me About Resilience

What Climbing Kilimanjaro Taught Me About Resilience

So full disclosure - I did not make it to the top of Kilimanjaro. I succumbed to a flu just as we reached base camp and thought better of attempting the summit with a fever and chills.

Flu notwithstanding, I have some incredible memories. Most of all, I was amazed by our guides Gipson, Eden, and James. These guys are the epitome of tough and disciplined. Week in and week out, they march (and sometimes carry) people up that mountain. They absolutely know what they're doing. More than that, they know how to get people who don't know what they're doing to the top.

How to tell people you can't help them

One of the hardest parts of humanitarian work is turning people away. You go into this work because you want to help people but the reality is sometimes you can't. Sometimes you have to say no - no to people who want and need and deserve help.

It never feels good to turn people away - for you or for them. So how do you do it well?